Tag Archives: jud dolphin

Room Dedicated to LUM Executive Directors

LUM Conference Room Dedication Ceremony

At a special reception last Thursday evening, the conference room in the LUM Office was dedicated to the Executive Directors of Lafayette Urban Ministry. The emcee for the event was the Rev. Don Nead.

Those honored at this event were as follows:

  • Executive Directors: Joe Micon, the Rev. Jud Dolphin & the Rev. Ron Elly
  • Acting Executive Director: Mary Anderson
  • Interim Executive Directors: the Rev. Kurt Kremlich & Jo Johannsen

Joan Low, LUM Board president, also bestowed the title of Executive Director Emeritus to Joe Micon, Rev. Jud Dolphin & Rev. Ron Elly; and Acting Executive Director Emerita to Mary Anderson. Accepting for the Rev. Ron Elly was his wife, Ellen. After the “ribbon cutting,” the guests attended a reception in the newly dedicated conference room, which now displays plaques in tribute to the above mentioned honorees.

It was a wonderful program and the beginning of a new LUM tradition.


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Salute to Joe Micon

{Pictured above L to R are the Rev. Don Nead, the Rev. Jud Dolphin, Ellen Elly, Joan Low, Mary Anderson, Cheryl Fowler & Joe Micon.}
To view more PHOTOS, click HERE.

Two LUM Executive Directors Connect in DC


Jud Dolphin & Joe Micon Meet in Washington DC

Joe Micon, current LUM executive director, recently visited with Jud Dolphin, immediate past LUM executive director, in Washington DC, the current residence for Jud.

The visit included in-depth conversations about issues facing the families served by Lafayette Urban Ministry and a special visit to All Souls Church Unitarian. Joe and Jud attended service and visited with senior minister, the Rev. Dr. Robert M. Hardies.

Joe Micon returned this week energized and ready to share what he learned on his trip with the LUM staff and board of directors.

Special thanks to Jud Dolphin for his hospitality and to Rev. Hardies for his service and personal time.

{Pictured above L to R: Jud Dolphin, Robert Hardies & Joe Micon.}


Jud Dolphin was the LUM Executive Director from 1978 to 1990. After 40 years working with social change organizations, Jud Dolphin retired and then joined the US Peace Corps. From 2009 to 2011, he served with the US Peace Corp in Konotop, Ukraine. He returned to Washington, DC where he taught English to new immigrants, conducted watercolor painting classes and furthered his personal artistic interests. Currently, Jud, through the US Peace Corps, is in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia, working as an organizational specialist with an NGO whose mission is to alleviate poverty.

March for Our Lives


The latest blog post from Jud Dolphin

jud green borderJud Dolphin is the immediate past executive director of Lafayette Urban Ministry, who periodically publishes an article on his blog.

His most recent post is timely and insightful. Please read Jud’s latest piece, “March for Our Lives” and let him know what you think. In the article, Jud shares,

“It’s sobering, but I’m encouraged to see so many Gen-Xers and Millennials. They greatly outnumbered us Baby Boomers. I think leadership for positive social change is being passed forward. New leaders. New energy. These young adults are so savvy. They know how to use technology, build inclusive coalitions and engage Americans to become more active citizens.”


To READ Jud Dolphin’s article online — click HERE.


Jud Dolphin was the LUM Executive Director from 1978 to 1990. After 40 years working with social change organizations, he retired and then joined the US Peace Corps. From 2009 to 2011, he served in Konotop, Ukraine. In 2015 to 2016, he served in Skopje, Macedonia as an organizational development specialist. Jud lives in Washington, DC where he is enjoying family and friends, creating art and volunteering for positive social change.

That’s How the Light Gets In


The latest blog post from Jud Dolphin


jud green borderJud Dolphin is the immediate past executive director of Lafayette Urban Ministry, who periodically publishes an article on his blog. His most recent post is timely and insightful. Please read Jud’s latest piece, “That’s How the Light Gets In” and let him know what you think.


Jud shares the following introduction to his article:

“Hello — Here we are post-election and before the holiday season. I’m sure I’m not the only one who has noticed this striking juxtaposition— discord and hope. I’ve added a post that hopefully will ignite further reflection.

If you read this post, please make sure you listen to the song as well—it’s soulful. We are living in troubled times and need the encouragement of one another. There is a crack in everything and I guess That’s How the Light Gets In.

Peace on Earth & Good Will to All.”


To READ Jud Dolphin’s article online — click HERE.


Jud Dolphin was the LUM Executive Director from 1978 to 1990. After 40 years working with social change organizations, Jud Dolphin retired and then joined the US Peace Corps. From 2009 to 2011, he served in Konotop, Ukraine. In 2015 to 2016, he served in Skopje, Macedonia as an organizational development specialist. Now he lives in Washington, DC where he is enjoying family and friends, creating art and volunteering for positive social change.

Jud Dolphin Asks “What About God’s Justice?”

jud green borderJud Dolphin recently shared with us his article which was published in this month’s issue of Лице в Лице, the street magazine for his current NGO. In this piece about social justice worldwide, he asks the question — “What about God’s justice?” Jud reflects on his experiences in the US as well as his current work in Macedonia.

It’s election year in both countries, so he shares his thoughts on candidates’ promises, partial justice, Utopian agendas, the need to remain positive and not dwell on the negative, and the tension between the ideals of justice and political reality.

What About God’s Justice? is a timely and compelling article.


Please READ the entire piece — click HERE to view Jud Dolphin’s article online.


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Jud Dolphin was the LUM Executive Director from 1978 to 1990. After 40 years working with social change organizations, Jud Dolphin retired and then joined the US Peace Corps. From 2009 to 2011, he served with the US Peace Corp in Konotop, Ukraine. He returned to Washington, DC where he taught English to new immigrants, conducted watercolor painting classes and furthered his personal artistic interests. Currently, Jud, through the US Peace Corps, is in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia, working as an organizational specialist with an NGO whose mission is to alleviate poverty.


 

Jud Dolphin – Role Model for Engagement

jud_pyramidJud Dolphin, the LUM Executive Director from 1978 to 1990, has embarked on a new adventure.

After 40 years working with social change organizations, Jud Dolphin retired and then joined the US Peace Corps. From 2009 to 2011, he served in Konotop, Ukraine.

He returned to Washington, DC where he has taught English to new immigrants, conducted watercolor painting classes and furthered his personal artistic interests.IMG_9618

Recently, the US Peace Corps invited Jud to a new assignment in Skopje, Macedonia. There he will be working with an NGO whose mission is to alleviate poverty.

Jud recently arrived in Macedonia and has promised to send regular updates on his experience in Macedonia.

Read Jud’s first blog post from Skopje and learn more about his new adventure — click HERE.

The History of the Lafayette Urban Ministry



Called to Serve: The Formation and Early History of the Lafayette Urban Ministry (1962-1992)



Although the Lafayette Urban Ministry was officially incorporated in 1972, its roots go back to 1962 and the work of the Neighborhood Development Project. NDP was started by a Purdue University student along with Doris Hanstra, wife of Hope Chapel Presbyterian Church pastor Rev. Peter Hanstra. Operating out of Hope chapel, NDP offered crafts and camp programs which attracted mostly south-side neighborhood youngsters. During the fall of 1966, an advisory board was created to watch over NDP and its use of Hope Chapel facilities.

Ron Elly
Ron Elly

After the retirement of the Hanstras in 1966, Hope Chapel called the Rev. Ron Elly as its new pastor. Rev Elly was installed in June 1967. He began his ministry with a commitment to blending the spiritual dimension of faith with the social dimensions. He saw his call as an opportunity for parish, pastoral, and community outreach ministry.

By September 1969, Covenant, Bethany, and Faith Presbyterian churches joined NDP making it a multi-church ministry. A small amount of funding and some guidance was received from the Presbytery of Crawfordsville’s National Missions Committee. By the end of the year, NDP had its own constitution, by-laws, and articles of incorporation. Rev. Elly continued to be very active in NDP serving as its coordinator.


By December of 1970, the vision of a broader ecumenical urban ministry began to take form. The NDP Board minutes for that month include the following entry:

Rev. Elly, having decided that this should be the last year he serves as both pastor of Hope Chapel and Coordinator of NDP, considered the important objectives of 1971 should be:

  1. to get Lafayette churches to contribute funds of approximately $10,000 for the salary and housing of a full-time director of NDP,
  2. to receive approval from the Presbytery of the terms of a call to that position, and,
  3. to seek the cooperation of the United Methodist church and the Roman Catholic Church in obtaining a second staff member for this urban ministry. The Presbyterian churches will need to approach other churches with a fairly definite plan and the question of whether they want to be included.

The effort to bring about a full-time “urban ministry” proceeded quickly in 1971. The December Board minutes included the final action in the emergence of LUM:

Mrs. Dee Tritchler moved and Les Gaylor seconded to change the name of the Neighborhood Development Project to Lafayette Urban Ministry, passing all the assets and liabilities of the one to the other. This was passed unanimously by all present. Rev. Beswick moved and Les Gaylor seconded to ask Central Presbyterian Church for office space in 1972. This passed unanimously.


An early LUM Board meeting, basement of Bethany Presbyterian Church, circa 1973
An early LUM Board meeting, basement of Bethany Presbyterian Church, circa 1973

The Lafayette Urban Ministry was officially incorporated as an Indiana Not-For-Profit Corporation on October 16, 1972. Seven churches were represented as charter members: Covenant Presbyterian, St. Andrew United Methodist, First United Methodist, Central Presbyterian, Dayton Presbyterian, Hope Chapel, and Bethany Presbyterian. Early programming at LUM was organized around three general issue areas: community development, youth, and aging. A Spanish-speaking and revenue sharing task force were started. The centralized emergency fund also began with the financial support of 13 churches. Seventy-two people were helped in 1975. Adventure clubs and summer camp continued for youth. Good friends and volunteer transportation programs were geared toward the low-income aged.


1976 – LUM Green Book is Published


Thanks to funding from the Lilly EndLUM Green Bookowment, research began which resulted in the publishing of the LUM Green Book — officially entitled The Lafayette Urban Ministry: A Model for Urban Ministries and an Evaluation of LUM and written by James D. Davidson, Purdue Sociology and Anthropology in collaboration with Ron Elly; Thomas Hull, LUM president; and Don Nead, campus pastor, University Church — the Dream Team. This report used LUM as a model for urban ministries who engage local churches in social concerns and action, particularly of low income families. It included the model for urban ministries that was developed and proposed by the LUM Board in 1976. The report concluded with an evaluation of LUM based on the model and gave specific recommendations. The Green Book has become legendary within Lafayette Urban Ministry and still is relevant and worth reading today.


By the time Rev. Elly resigned as the LUM director in October 1977, the LUM Board of Directors had grown to 22 churches and four paid staff members.


The LUM Partnership: A Model for Urban Ministry

After the resignation of Rev. Ron Elly in September of 1977, the LUM Board appointed the Rev. Kremlick, Pastor of Dayton Memorial Presbyterian Church, as interim head of staff. On January 11, 1978, the LUM Board of Directors and pastors of member churches interviewed Rev. Jud Dolphin and voted to call him as the new LUM Executive Director. Rev. Dolphin took over in March 1978.

Jud Dolphin
Jud Dolphin

In March of 1979 the first issue of the SEED newsletter was published. It was targeted at LUM supporters and those in member congregations who shared a special call to social ministry. Rev. Dolphin made himself available to preach in LUM member churches and began to strengthen strong ties with local media. News coverage of LUM program and issues facing low-income families identified LUM as a strong advocate for the poor in our community.

By 1981 LUM had grown to 29 member churches and a staff of four. LUM program also expanded to include the first Seeds of Vision Conference, Grow-A Row, Repairs On Wheels, and Jubilee Christmas. LUM Camp and the Centralized Emergency Fund continued while the volunteer transportation program was transferred to the Tippecanoe Senior Center.

A Public Policy Committee began to meet monthly to discuss the broader social justice issues facing LUM clients. A staff member was assigned to the committee and a quarterly newsletter, Agenda for Social Concerns, was published.

Soon thereafter, the LUM Board further expanded its Social Justice programming by creating the Indiana Task Force on Poor Relief. LUM’s influence reached statewide as a network of 11 ecumenical ministries was engaged to help bring reform to Indiana’s ailing township poor relief system. Legislation was introduced before the Indiana General Assembly, several research projects were conducted, and a statewide media and advocacy campaign was launched. A monthly newsletter, The Overseer, was published. And LUM established itself as a statewide voice for the public policy concerns of public assistance recipients.

By 1983 LUM’s self-help programming had grown to include several community gardens, gardening assistance, and food buying clubs. The host/hostess program was bringing hundreds of church members to LUM each year as ministers of hospitality. And a food pantry had established itself in LUM’s basement as an outgrowth of the advocate program.

In 1984 LUM and St. Thomas Aquinas established Lafayette’s first emergency shelter for 2015-08-24 525 019 (2) (1024x682)the homeless. The shelter was housed on the second floor of LUM’s 8th street office and was moved to St. Boniface Church in 1987. Subsequently, the shelter was included in the main LUM building when it was built at 525 N. 4th Street.

After a year-long evaluation in 1988 the Poor Relief Task Force was reorganized into Indiana Welfare Watch. Still active in policy concerns of needy Hoosiers, the program grew to include a Board controlled by the welfare recipients and a more comprehensive issue agenda. In 1988 LUM also formed the Local Government Watch, a community based organization of 200 LUM clients seeking to influence reforms in the administration of poor relief in Fairfield Township.

On August 15, 1990 Rev. Dolphin resigned as the LUM executive director to accept the position of Senior Field Organizer with the Washington D.C. based Food Research Action Center. Under his leadership the LUM annual budget had grown from $58,620 to $278,790. LUM grew from 10 to 21 programs, 22 to 35 member churches and from a staff of four to a staff of eight. Jo Johannsen was appointed Interim Executive Director by the LUM Board of Directors.


Joseph “Joe” Micon

On October 10, 1990 Joseph Micon received a final interview by the LUM Board and was appointed as the third LUM Executive Director with duties that began October 15, 1990. A Roman Catholic, Micon was a product of Catholic education. He received his Master’s Degree in Social Work from Indiana University in 1983 with a special training in the administration of Not-for-Profit organizations. He had served various LUM staff capacities since 1980. Like the previous LUM executive directors, Micon also shares a strong commitment to integrating the charitable components of social ministry with the social justice components. A special emphasis on the problems of children and families in poverty helps direct the program. Let’s Do Lunch, the CCHIP, childhood hunger study, and a babysitting room for LUM clients were new additions to LUM programs. In addition, the LUM food pantry, emergency shelter and centralized emergency fund were all expanded. New advisory councils for pastors as well as LUM clients were added by the Board.

LUM ended its first 20 years of ministry with 44 member congregations, 7 permanent staff members, 1500 volunteers and an annual budget of $299,400. Twenty-three programs of service, self-help and advocacy reached 70% of Tippecanoe County’s poor.

In October 1992 LUM celebrated its 20th Anniversary with an awards banquet and worship service.

In 2012, LUM celebrated its 40th Anniversary with the LUM Good Samaritan Fund Follies fundraising event with silent auction. LUM Follies became an annual event to raise funds and aware for the Good Samaritan Fund, Good Samaritan Program & the ID Clinic. LUM began using social media as a part of the 40th anniversary as well.

On April 1, 2020, Wes Tillett became the fourth Executive Director of Lafayette Urban MInistry.

Although the future of LUM has not yet been written, its work of serving and helping will continue.



LUM Achieve! Students “March on Washington”

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“LUM Youth Trip to Washington DC”


Travel Blog — LUM Youth Trip to Washington


Friday, August 23, 2013


7 a.m.


Anthony, Lourdes, Makaylah, TK, Cassandra, Noah and Fatima arrived — excited — for the bus ride to Washington DC. They loaded the bus quickly; they were loud for a bit; then, they were all asleep shortly there after.


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Left to Right:
(Front Row) Sandra Dunn-El, Makaylah Douglas (Jefferson High School), Fatima Sanchez (Jefferson High School), Lourdes Sanchez (Jefferson High School);
(Back Row) – Joe Tylenda, Joe Micon, TK Young (Jefferson High School), Anthony Hicks (West Lafayette High School), Noah Ortiz (Wea Ridge Middle School), Cassandra Ortiz (McCutcheon High School)


NOON


Their first stop was a quick potty-break at a rest stop off the highway in Ohio.

The next stop was McDonald’s in Licking, Ohio near Buckeye Lake. Quick lunch — recharge devices — and then back on the road.


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The road trip east to Washington DC was long but fun. The students got to know each other better and learned a little bit about US history too. The students were given a handout on the bus that included vocabulary terms which related to the original March on Washington. After lunch the students were quizzed on the definition of terms like civil rights, desegregate, federalize, 15th Amendment, legacy, orator, poll tax, universal human kinship, SNCC, SCLC, and NAACP. There was an initial groan about having “school work” on the bus – but the students soon got into the spirit of the exercise. Some students initiated ice-breakers and even sang the “State Song” at one point. 


2:21 p.m.


The traffic was relatively light with only a couple of delays. It was no time before we hit the Ohio River and approached the border of West Virginia. With only two hours to go, they stopped for another brief rest break/potty break. They took a bit of a detour through the backwoods of Pennsylvania close to the West Virginia border – but the GPS guided us through. Our driver navigated the narrow, hilly roads with ease as we passed trailer homes and a Hub Cap Center – all in search of a restroom.

The Bus Driver -- "Little" Joe Tylenda
The Bus Driver — “Little” Joe Tylenda


At the rest-stop, Joe Micon led the group in stretching exercises before reloading the bus.


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9 p.m.


The LUM bus arrives at the Fifteen Street Presbyterian Church in Washington DC. Church staff and Jud Dolphin (immediate past LUM executive director) greeted us upon our arrival. 


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The group headed to dinner at the Italian Kitchen on U only a couple of block from the church.


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11 p.m.


The student returned to the church and settled in for the night. Tomorrow is a big day. The plan is to get to the Lincoln Memorial by 8 a.m. Good night.



Saturday, August 24, 2013


8 a.m.


After a quick breakfast the students head out to the March on Washington.

We met up with Jud Dolphin our local tour guide and decide to take the Metro to the White House. This was the first “subway” experience for most of our students. We arrived in the area of the White House and stopped briefly to check out a T-shirt sales table — one of hundreds in DC today. We obviously were only able to see the White House from outside the fence — but it was a beautiful, clear view.


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We then wandered through Lafayette Square to see more statues and enjoy the view of the White House with the Washington Monument in the background.


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We then headed to the National Mall. On the way there we saw many more sites including the Treasury Building.

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9:30 a.m.


They soon saw the Washington Monument in the distance and headed in that direction. Once they entered the National Mall near the Washington Monument we began to realize just how big the turn out was for the March on Washington. It was a big crowd filled with energy and hope — and the students were proud and excited to be a part of this historic day.


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The students explored the National Mall, the Washington Monument and the World War II Memorial. From the WWII Memorial they had a clear yet distant view of the program at the Lincoln Memorial across the entire reflection pool.


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NOON


They then decided to stop fighting the crowd and go to the King Memorial. To their delight the Rosa Parks Bus (the actual bus) was near the King Memorial — so, the student were able to enjoy and experience both.


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They then had a picnic lunch under the trees on the National Mall — and decided to leave the March on Washington area.


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1:30 p.m.


They headed to the Smithsonian’s Nation Museum of Natural History. This was a special treat for the students since a visit to the Smithsonian was not on our original itinerary. Interestingly, most of the students remember this museum from the Ben Stiller movie — Night at the Museum. They each had their own favorite exhibit in the museum that they eagerly shared with each other — from the Hope Diamond to the Ocean to the Mammals.


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They then headed to the Metro station but first visited the US Capitol Building.


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5:30 p.m.


They then headed to the Cleveland Park neighborhood for dinner. Jud recommended a wonderful Vietnamese restaurant — Nam Viet. Many of the students were anxious about trying Vietnamese cuisine for the first time — but when dinner was over — everyone raved about their meal.


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7 p.m.


They then attended a screening of Lee Daniel’s The Butler. There could not have been a more perfect movie for this group, at this moment, in this place. After a weekend filled with conversation and experiences surrounding the US civil rights movement — The Butler was a powerful movie to see. It was also extra special that the movie is set in Washington DC — mostly in the White House. Everyone LOVED the movie, which sparked a lively conversation for the rest of the night and into the next day.


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9:30 p.m.


The students capped off the night with a trip to the neighborhood fro-yo shop — Yogiberry. After enjoying their fro-yo and conversations, they said good-bye to Jud Dolphin and took the Metro back to Dupont Center and our homebase, the Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church.


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A truly historic day for our students.



Sunday, August 25, 2013


5:30 a.m.


The LUM bus is all packed and is heading home to Lafayette, Indiana. Estimated time of arrival is 7 p.m. EST.


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9:30 a.m.


Once the long journey home had begun, all were eager to get home and share their stories with their family and friends. There were only a few stops en route to Indiana — one to a rest stop in Pennsylvania, which honored the coal miners.


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6:30 p.m.


When the LUM Achieve students arrived back home at the LUM Ray Ewry Youth Center — the students’ families were waiting in anticipation of hearing all about their children’s trip.


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7 p.m.


The local TV station was also waiting for our students to return to get interviews a couple of our students about their experience Marching on Washington in 2013, 50 years after the original march in 1963.


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Before they departed, the students could not leave without a couple of more group photos.


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Upon reflection, Joe Micon stated,

What a memorable trip with a terrific group of young people! “Thank you” Sandra Dunn-El, Pablo Malavenda and Joe Tylenda for doing such an excellent job of keeping the young people safe during the weekend. LUM is grateful for your dedication and energy. “Thank you” to former LUM executive director Jud Dolphin for being our trail guide while in Washington. And “thank you” to our very gracious hosts at 15th Street Presbyterian Church in DC. We learn so much about race and civil rights. We also learned how difficult it can be to exit 12 people from a Metro car at the same time!


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To see all of the pictures from the LUM Youth Trip to Washington, click HERE.



POSTED – August 19, 2013

August 28, 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King’s famed “I Have a Dream” speech. This anniversary presents the perfect opportunity to teach about the history of the civil rights movement and the ongoing effects of racial discrimination in our nation and communities.

The Lafayette Urban Ministry is providing 10 local high school students, who are participants in LUM’s Achieve! Stay-in School Program, the opportunity to go to our nation’s capital this weekend to participate in 50th Anniversary activities.

While in Washington DC the LUM students will visit the sites, listen to the speeches and meet people that will help them to gain a better understanding of our nation’s struggle with race, how far we’ve progressed in overcoming racism, and what important work remains to be done.

The students will leave this Friday morning, August 23rd, from LUM Ray Ewry Youth Center (525 N. 4th Street, Lafayette). The LUM students will then spend the full day on Saturday participating in 50th Anniversary activities, and return to Lafayette on Sunday evening, August 25. While in Washington DC, LUM’s Achieve! students will be the guests of the congregation of the historic Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church (more church history HERE).


HOW YOU CAN HELP!


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“LUM Youth Trip to Washington DC”

The students chosen to attend this educational trip are those who have shown special promise and progress through during their participation in LUM’s Achieve! Program.

The three-day trip to Washington DC, including transportation, food, materials will cost $100 for each student.

Are you able to help LUM defray these costs with a gift of $30, $50, $100 or even $500?

Click HERE to make your donation. Thank you!


Check in HERE often for updates and photos direct from the LUM Youth Trip to Washington.



Join LUM online and help us serve children and families even better.


   

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