Category Archives: Uncategorized

Neil Klemme Match Program Raises $8,355

LUM was excited to partner again this year with the Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency, a local small business, for the annual November Match Program. Thanks to the generosity of Neil Klemme, State Farm, and all of our November donors the effort raised more than $8,355. This will give LUM a tremendous boost in the effort to support local families and children in our community with Christmas assistance. LUM is fortunate and grateful to have this support from the Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency — and YOU! Please contact Neil Klemme when you get a chance and thank him and his team.

Klemme Match – NOW through November 30

Double Your Donation – Double Your Impact

For ONLY 6 MORE DAYS, the Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency of West Lafayette is offering a “$3,000 Match Donation” in support of LUM. Take advantage of this unique opportunity to “double your donation” to LUM and increase your impact on strengthening local families thanks to the generosity of Neil Klemme Insurance Agency.

It’s simple — click the “Klemme Match” button (NOW through Tuesday, November 30), make a donation, and the Neil Klemme Insurance Agency will match donations up to $3,000. This is an exciting partnership because Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency is a local business. LUM is fortunate and grateful to have this support from Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency.


November 1 through November 30
Neil Klemme Insurance Agency will Match your Donation to LUM

Holder Bedding Match Donation

Neil Klemme Insurance $3,000 Match Donation


Klemme Match – NOW through November 30

Double Your Donation – Double Your Impact

For the entire month of November, the Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency of West Lafayette is offering a “$3,000 Match Donation” in support of LUM. Take advantage of this unique opportunity to “double your donation” to LUM and increase your impact on strengthening local families thanks to the generosity of Neil Klemme Insurance Agency.

It’s simple — click the “Klemme Match” button from November 1 through November 30, make a donation, and the Neil Klemme Insurance Agency will match donations up to $3,000.

This is an exciting partnership because Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency is a local business. LUM is fortunate and grateful to have this support from Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency.


November 1 through November 30
Neil Klemme Insurance Agency will Match your Donation to LUM

Holder Bedding Match Donation

Neil Klemme Insurance $3,000 Match Donation


Neil Klemme Insurance $3,000 Match Program

$3,000 Match – Entire Month of November

For the entire month of November, the Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency of West Lafayette is offering a “$3,000 Match Donation” in support of LUM. Take advantage of this unique opportunity to “double your donation” to LUM and increase your impact on strengthening local families thanks to the generosity of Neil Klemme Insurance Agency.

It’s simple — click the “Klemme Match” button from November 1 through November 30, make a donation, and the Neil Klemme Insurance Agency will match donations up to $3,000.

This is an exciting partnership because Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency is a local business. LUM is fortunate and grateful to have this support from Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency.


November 1 through November 30
Neil Klemme Insurance Agency will Match your Donation to LUM

Holder Bedding Match Donation

 

Neil Klemme Insurance $3,000 Match Donation

 


Neil Klemme Insurance $3,000 Match Program

$3,000 Match – Entire Month of November

For the entire month of November, the Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency of West Lafayette is offering a “$3,000 Match Donation” in support of LUM. Take advantage of this unique opportunity to “double your donation” to LUM and increase your impact on strengthening local families thanks to the generosity of Neil Klemme Insurance Agency.

It’s simple — click the “Klemme Match” button from November 1 through November 30, make a donation, and the Neil Klemme Insurance Agency will match donations up to $3,000.

This is an exciting partnership because Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency is a local business. LUM is fortunate and grateful to have this support from Neil Klemme State Farm Insurance Agency.


November 1 through November 30
Neil Klemme Insurance Agency will Match your Donation to LUM

Holder Bedding Match Donation

Neil Klemme Insurance $3,000 Match Donation

 


Port of Hope – Let’s Dance



This year the LUM Port of Hope event promises to be an exciting evening filled with great food, cash bar and lively entertainment, including three dance groups. Throughout the event, participants will be treated to dance showcases from La Milonguera Argentinean Tango Club of Purdue, Irish Dance – Purdue Chapter, and Purdue Salsa Dance Club.


La Milonguera Argentinean Tango

La Milonguera Argentinean Tango Club was founded more than 20 years ago and celebrates the music, culture, language, history, and dance of Argentina. The organization has 50 members, offers tango instruction for all levels, hosts workshops and dance events with live bands, sponsors movie nights, takes field trips, offers public performances, and attends festivals and conventions. James Foster leads the Tango Club and will be dancing with Zahra Ghorrati at this year’s Port of Hope.

James Foster earned a bachelor’s in Biology and is working on his Master’s in Biochemical & Molecular Nutrition both at Purdue. He is originally from Roland, OK, lived in Beijing for four years, and now lives in West Lafayette. After graduates in December, James plans on teaching high school biology and chemistry. He began dancing tango at age 20 and has performed in Los Angeles, Chicago, Beijing, Indianapolis, and San Francisco.


Irish Dance – Purdue Chapter

Shannon Doran, Morgan Wetzel, Christina Pansino, and Molly Delaney

Irish Dance – Purdue Chapter has eight members and offers instruction in Céilí dance style and for traditional set dances like St. Patrick’s Day, Garden of the Daisies, and The Blackbird. Shannon Doran founded Irish Dance – Purdue Chapter in August 2021 as an organization that gives experienced dancers the opportunity to pursue their passion for performing in a social and competitive atmosphere, allowing for opportunities to share their skills with non-experienced dancers. Members are able to learn from one another and to build friendships through participation in workshops, fundraisers, and multi-cultural events as well as being able to to interact with students and faculty in a collaborative, creative, and inventive environment.

Port of Hope will be their second public performance. They performed for the first time this past weekend at Purdue Family Weekend. At Port of Hope, Irish Dance will dance, in the Céilí style, a hard shoe (like a tap shoe) and a soft shoe (like a ballet shoe) dance with an interactive jig lesson. The members of the Irish Dance club pictured L to R are as follows:

  • Shannon DoranFounder & President, is from Tinley Park, IL, a sophomore pursuing a major in Communications, and a member of Evans Scholars. She started dancing at age two, has been competing in Irish dance for ten years and has danced in Phoenix, Cleveland, Savannah, Indianapolis, and Chicago, where she competed in the Mid-American Irish Dance Competition. Shannon Doran’s great, great, great grandmother, Margret McNulty, grew up in Ballinrobe County Mayo Ireland. Margret fell in love with a much older man from Germany. They had a son named Daniel and immigrated to the Chicago area and Pennsylvania, where she brought her love and passion for Irish culture by sharing family recipes and holiday traditions and maintaining a strong faith. 
  • Morgan Wetzelmember, is from Highlands Ranch, CO, and a freshman majoring in Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology.
  • Christina Pansino, treasurer, is from Elmhurst, IL, and a senior in Film & Video Studies.
  • Molly DelaneyVice President of Choreography, is from Grayslake, IL, and a Freshman planning on pursuing a degree in Environmental and Ecological Engineering
  • Samantha Maxwellmember, is a sophomore studying Law & Society. Her grandmother immigrated from Ireland to start the Kelly School of Irish Dance in the United States to spread the pure bliss Irish dancing brings to the community. Not pictured.

Salsa Dance Club

The Purdue Salsa Dance Club is one of the largest and most active student organizations at Purdue. The club focus mainly on Salsa dancing, but occasionally teach Merengue, Bachata, Cha Cha, and other forms of Latin dance. The Purdue Salsa Club provides weekly classes for all levels and provide social nights, where dancers can practice the new choreography taught in class and have fun dancing.

At Port of Hope, the Purdue Salsa Dance Club will demonstrate salsa and bachata as well as offer an interactive mini-lesson.

LUM Seeds of Vision – Volume 2, Edition 2


Spotlight on Five Noteworthy Regional Programs

The LUM Seeds of Vision is a quarterly electronic newsletter, which provides a platform for Ecumenical Social Service Agencies from across the East North Central region (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio & Wisconsin) to share their knowledge and experience with each other.

Below is a list of the articles recently published in the latest edition of the Seeds of Vision eNewsletter.

  • Family Promise of Greater Lafayette, Inc., Lafayette, IN
  • Iron House – Guiding Light Ministries, Grand Rapids, MI
  • Smart Choice Market – Westerville Area Resource Ministry, Westerville, OH
  • Soup of Success (SOS) – Church Community Service, Elkhart County, IN
  • Supper House – North End Community Ministry, Grand Rapids, MI

As communities of faith engaged in the hard work of lifting up the “least among us,” there is so much that agencies can learn from others. By coming together and sharing both challenges and our successes — each agency will find new ways to help those in their our community.

To view the Seeds of Vision eNewsletter V2E2, click HERE.

Hunger Hike Announces 2021 Co-Chair


Coach Nathan Walker – Honorary Co-Chair

At a recent event, Hunger Hike announced the 2021 Honorary Co-chair — Nathan Walker, Purdue Rowing & Crew Team head coach.

Coach Walker was named head coach in July. He is a Purdue alumnus and before returning to Purdue most recently led the rowing program at Culver Academies. {Pictured L to R: Duane Sellers, St. Thomas Aquinas Haiti Ministry; Coach Nathan Walker; Katy Bunder, CEO/president, Food Finders Food Bank, Inc.; and Wes Tillett, LUM executive director.}

Coach Walker shared that he is excited about Hunger Hike for three reason. First, the event raises money for vital food and nutrition programs and support. Second, as a Purdue student he participated in Hunger Hike and is honored to return in this new role. And lastly, he is proud to continue the tradition of engaging the Purdue rowing athletes in Hunger Hike, started by his former coach and predecessor, Coach Dave Kucik. Wes Tillett, LUM executive director, is thrilled that Coach Walker supports Hunger Hike, and the Purdue student athletes will continue to play an important role in the kick-off event on Riehle Plaza on Sunday, September 19.

SoV – Supper House


North End Community Ministry

Laura Castle, Executive Director

On a typical Tuesday, at St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic Church cafeteria in Grand Rapids, MI, guests can be found sitting at tables being served by volunteer waiters, all receiving a hot, nutritious meal served with dignity and respect in a restaurant type setting. North End Community Ministry (NECM) maintains that all people have a ‘Basic Right to Food,’ so in addition to their broad range of Food Pantry services they also provide this free weekly meal that’s open to anyone in the community.

When attending, guests can often be found sitting at the same table every week – sometimes a table of people they met through Supper House! It’s a place where people who live alone can find fellowship and support, where members of the community can gather for an informal discussion of important issues, and where friends and family can meet over a shared meal – like the four siblings who’ve been gathering there every week for years.

Supper House also provides an opportunity for the staff from NECM to form deeper connections with the people they serve and to uncover challenges that might otherwise remain hidden. NECM’s Executive Director, Laura Castle, shared the story of a woman who came for dinner and mentioned to diners at her table that she was about to be evicted.  From there, word spread and staff were able to jump in and facilitate assistance for this woman to stay in her home – all because of the connections developed over a shared meal.

The program averages 125 to 150 diners a night.  Sometimes a keyboardist comes by to play music during the meals. On other occasions, nursing students from Calvin University might come to provide blood pressure and blood sugar screenings for the guests. Joy is to be had during the holidays, as a special meal is served at both Thanksgiving time and Christmas, together with gifts distributed to the whole family!

Laura Castle started Supper House in 2003.  She had heard about another program called Supper House in Muskegon and was inspired to start a similar program in the Grand Rapids area. They hired a coordinator and soon had 50 people coming each night. NECM has long maintained relationships with more than 20 local churches that assist with volunteers, resources and financial support for its programs.  It appeared to be a great fit to enlist those churches in Supper House, and all these years later many of them continue to faithfully serve. A few other community organizations also assist periodically.

A church or organization adopts an evening, paying $250 to cover the cost of the meal and providing 10-12 volunteers to set-up, serve, visit with guests and clean-up. Some groups sign-up once a month, others once a year, and on those rare occasions where a date is left unfilled, the coordinators from NECM just need to put out the call and volunteers show up.  At the time the pandemic came on the scene in March of 2020, Supper House was temporarily put on hold, with plans to reopen again when it was safe.  Now, as vaccinations increase and infection rates drop, Supper House is finally back. As of July, NECM’s neighbors can once again be seen streaming in to join their new found friends at the table, where Supper House has long been serving as a focal point for the community.

To learn more, click here – http://necmgr.org/programs-and-services/northeast-supper-house/

SoV – Smart Choice


Westerville Area Resource Ministry

Scott Marier, Executive Director

The Westerville Area Resource Ministry (WARM) was founded in 1972. One of their major programs is the Choice Market food pantry, which distributes the equivalent of 600,000 meals a year. They were one of the first agencies in central Ohio to adopt the choice model, and see it as integral to their mission of treating people with dignity and respect.

Prior to COVID, the market was set up like a grocery store where clients worked with a volunteer to pick out their food. Each person was allotted enough food to provide for three meals per day for a week for everyone in their family, and clients could visit the market twice each month.

With the pandemic, WARM had to revert to a curbside model, providing their clients with small, medium, or large bags of pre-packaged groceries. As the crisis progressed, the lack of choice became a serious issue. WARM responded by partnering with Smart Choice to create an online shopping platform similar to that used by large grocery stores. Clients are now able to sign in 24/7 and select their groceries from more than 325 different items. Those without internet access can place their orders over the phone, and as each item is selected the software automatically removes it from WARM’s inventory.

All orders require two business days to process. Clients have to choose a pick up time when placing their order. Volunteers pull the selected products from the shelves and bring them to a central table where orders are double-checked and sorted for quality. When clients arrive, volunteers greet them, verify their names, and assign them to a parking space. Once parked, groceries are delivered to their car.

WARM makes an effort to offer pastoral care as well. Usually a pastor from WARM’s network of churches is available on site. Clients can have access to support and spiritual counseling while waiting for their food. In addition, clients can make an appointment to speak with one of WARM’s family service coordinators for more in-depth assistance.

While this approach has returned clients to some semblance of choice, WARM’s goal is to reopen the market to in-person shopping. They believe connections formed during in-person shopping are essential to building real relationships and helping people move towards self-sufficiency. At the same time, WARM recognizes that not everyone wants this type of in-depth assistance. Moving forward, their plan is to offer two ways of shopping: in-person for those who are open to case management, and online ordering for those who just want the food.

WARM is working diligently to document the process they developed in setting up this system in an effort to provide a set of simple, user-friendly procedures for other agencies to follow.

To learn more, click here – https://warmwesterville.org/choice-market